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The word hijab, or a derivative, appears only eight times in the Koran as an “obstacle” or “wall of separation” (), a “curtain” (), “hidden” (), just a “wall of separation” (41:5, , ), “hiding” () and “prevented” or “denied access to God” ().

In the Koran, the word hijab never connotes any act of piety.

Rather, it carries the negative connotation of being an actual or metaphorical obstacle separating the “non-believers” in a dark place, noting “our hearts are under hijab (41:5),” for example, a wall of separation between those in heaven and those in hell () or “Surely, they will be mahjaboon from seeing their Lord that day ().” Mahjaboon is a derivate verb from hijab.

The Saudi Koran translates it as “veiled.” Actually, in this usage, it means, “denied access.” The most cited verse to defend the headscarf () states, “Oh, Prophet tell thy wives and thy daughters and the believer women to draw their jilbab close around them; this will be better so that they be recognized and not harmed and God is the most forgiving, most merciful.” According to Arabic dictionaries, jilbab means “long, overflowing gown” which was the traditional dress at the time.

Unfortunately, the idea of “hijab” as a mandatory headscarf is promulgated by naïve efforts such as “World Hijab Day,” started in 2013 by Nazma Khan, the Bangladeshi American owner of a Brooklyn-based headscarf company, and Ahlul Bayt, a Shiite-proselytizing TV station, that the University of Calgary, in southwest Canada, promotes as a resource for its participation in “World Hijab Day.” The TV station argues that wearing a “hijab” is necessary for women to avoid “unwanted attention.” World Hijab Day, Ahlul Bayt and the University of Calgary didn’t respond to requests for comment.